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Please be aware of Refund scams and unsolicited calls.


Thank you for choosing MCHelper Inc. (Online Technical Support) as your trusted technical support partner for your PC/ Mac and Peripheral devices.  We appreciate and value our relationship with you and assure you the best possible services at times. Our team of technical support engineers has successfully delivered the best technology solutions to you, our client. We are completely focused on delivering excellent customer experiences and continually improving our services to make MCHelper as a top Technical Support company across multiple countries.

We would like to inform you that MCHelper never makes an unsolicited call to any customer. Our representatives call back a customer only on customer’s request. It is our humble suggestion to you that you should refuse to share your computer sessions with any such unsolicited callers imitating to be from a technical support company. If you have any doubt about the caller identity, please ask the caller to verify your customer ID and verify the phone number and give us a call to verify the authenticity of the caller. Remember that the company MCHelper Inc. only uses the following 2 Toll-free for our customers.

They are as follows 1-888-990-9524 and the other is 1-888-995-5185. 


MCHelper does not use any other Toll-free number to reach its customers. So if the number does not match exactly then never allow any caller to connect to your computer. We would request you to report this matter to our customer services team or technical support dept. with details of the caller’s telephone number, so that we can report this matter to necessary authority to stop this harassment to our valued customers in future.

It is critical if you are contacted by someone. please get their information and contact us immediately. 

DO NOT SHARE YOUR COMPUTER OR PERSONAL INFORMATION. 

Hang up the phone. Scammers will use caller ID “spoofing”.  In simpler terms, caller ID spoofing allows a scammer  to display a phone number different than the actual number from which the call was placed. With caller ID spoofing, a scammer can send and receive outgoing or incoming phone calls or texts that appear to be from any phone number of their choosing. An example would be the caller ID showing MCHelper to fool you into thinking that the call is a genuine call from MCHelper, or any other trusted organization. The most common inquiry we receive from our customers are calls from scammers claiming to represent Apple® Microsoft®, HP®, Dell®, MChelper, the IRS or the customer’s bank.
What Are Refund and/or Recovery Scams
Refund and recovery scams have the scammer trying to convince a victim that they are entitled to claiming a refund from a certain organization, or that they are eligible for a rebate or reimbursement from their government or bank (or any other relevant organization). 
The scammer will make comments that will entice the victim to feel comfortable. The most common one that we hear is that the organization is going out of business, has lost their licensing, no longer doing business in a certain territory and that the victim is eligible for a refund.  
Another common trick is to claim the victim is eligible for a refund because they fell prey to another scam. The scammer will then make assurances that they will be able to help the victim get their money back.
The most common claim is that the scammer claims to be someone from the government, or that they work for a bank or a trusted organization. They usually contact the victim by email or phone, but they might also send them a letter or a text message. 

The main goal of the scammer is to get the victim to make an up-front payment, and maybe even convince them to make other future payments too. However, they might also go the extra mile and try to get the victim to share their personal data with them, effectively subjecting the victim to identity theft.


How Do Refund Scams Work?

The scammer starts out by emailing the victim or giving them a phone call, and letting them know they are eligible to claim a large refund or rebate/reimbursement from the government, bank or trusted organization. 
Now, the scammer will claim they are working for or with the government in the victim’s country, that they are working for a well-known bank, or working for a trusted organization that the victim may or may not have done business with in the past.. They might claim they hold a different position, but it will still be an official-sounding one, like the Manager of the Refund or Reimbursement Dept.. 
The scammer will start telling the victim how they are owed a refund by a company, or how they can claim a large sum of money from the government, bank, or trusted organization usually citing overpaid taxes or fees as the main reason behind that. 
If the victim has previously fallen for another scam and lost money because of it, the scammer might pose as an agency that’s able to recover the money the victim lost. Since it plays on the victim’s emotions, they are very likely to believe the scammer in this situation. 

In order for the victim to claim the money they are owed (or get back the money they lost), they will be asked to make a payment that’s supposed to cover “administrative fees and taxes.” The fee can go up to $1000 (or more), but scammers usually keep it down to a more “manageable” number so that they don’t tip off the victim that something’s wrong. 
If the victim becomes suspicious or asks for proof, the scammer will have plenty of fake documents ready to send over to the victim. The scammer might even ask them to sign the documents, which means they will now have a copy of the victim’s signature. 
The scammer will also ask the victim to provide copies of their personal and financial documents, as well as sensitive personal info (like full name, physical address, mobile or landline number). The scammer will claim this info is needed to get the “authorization” process started, so that the victim can claim the money. The scammer might even attach a form the victim needs to complete in order to gather their personal info and make everything seem more legit. 
If the victim agrees to make the payment, they will be asked to use:

  • Direct wire transfers
  • Money-transfer services
  • Prepaid cards
  • Cryptocurrencies


In case the victim asks to pay with their credit card, the scammer will usually tell them that’s not possible. 
Once the payment is made, the victim won’t receive the money they were promised. If they are even more unlucky, the scammer will try to get them to agree to make more payments. 
If the victim agrees to share the personal info requested by the scammer, they open themselves up to identity theft, as the scammer will now have access to their:

  • Passport info
  • Personal identification info
  • Bank account details
  • Credit card details


The scammer will likely use that info for other fraudulent purposes, or they might just sell it off to other scammers.


PLEASE REMEMBER, MCHELPER DOES NOT CONTACT OUR CUSTOMER’S UNLESS ASKED TO DO SO. IF YOU HAVE BEEN CONTACTED BY SOMEONE CLAIMING TO BE FROM ANY GOVERNMENT ENTITY, MCHELPER  OR ANY OTHER “TRUSTED” ORGANIZATION OFFERING YOU A REFUND OR MAKING ANY THREATENING COMMENTS, PLEASE HANG UP IMMEDIATELY AND CALL US BACK ON THE TOLL-FREE NUMBERS THAT WERE PROVIDED.

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